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Niagara on the Lake, Ontario, Canada
My virtue is that I say what I think, my vice that what I think doesn't amount to much.

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Weekend Words: Plagiarism

Federico Zuccaro, “Taddeo Zuccaro Copying the Antique Statues in Rome” (n.d.), pen and ink and wash, 183 x 425 mm, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence (image via Web Gallery of Art)
Plagiarism is a word that has cropped up in the minds of many since the wife of the Republican nominee "borrowed" passages from the wife of the current Democratic president. Here are a few quotes on the subject:

Art is either plagiarism or revolution.
—Paul Gauguin 
Originality is nothing but judicious plagiarism
—Voltaire 
The only “ism” Hollywood believes in is plagiarism.
—Dorothy Parker 
Man is an idiot. He doesn’t know how to do anything without copying, without imitating, without plagiarizing, without aping. It might even have been that man invented generation by coitus after seeing the grasshopper copulate.
—Augusto Roa Bastos

Ten ‘lost’ books you should read now



As the revival of lost works takes the publishing world by storm, Lucy Scholes delves into the archive to uncover the best hidden literary gems. These are all new to me (I guess that's why they are considered "lost") and I want to read them all.

See them here

Fully Booked


Are you the biggest bookworm around?  Well here is the big book tent for the big book fan (and a friend) It looks like a giant has dropped his favourite best seller just for you to find shelter in.

Available at FieldCandy

Via

Two Brazilian sci-fi books



Biblioklept posted two books by Brazilian authors :The Order of the Day by Marcio Souza, and Murilo Rubio’s collection The Ex-Magician and Other Stories.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

Zelda: A Worksheet



Zelda Fitzgerald’s letters to her husband, Scott between the spring of 1919 and Easter Sunday, 1920, the day Zelda and Scott married. Zelda Fitzgerald was born this month in 1900.

Read more 

Live From Prison, Oscar Wilde’s Letter

Patti Smith, Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes and the novelist Colm Toibin are among the artists who will read from Oscar Wilde’s “De Profundis,” in the prison in which he wrote it.

Via

First lines of popular books


Via Boing Boing

The JT LeRoy Hoax

In the late 90s, JT LeRoy’s autobiography of his abuse as a young man became smash cult hit with a large following of celebrity fans. JT himself was a mystery: shy and hiding behind a floppy hat, big sunglasses and a blond wig. Then the true story emerged. The person claiming to be JT was actually a woman named Savannah Knoop. The real author of JT LeRoy’s novels was Knoop’s sister-in-law.

Savannah Knoop as JT LeRoy
Jeff Feuerzeig's new documentary about the hoax titled  Author: The JT LeRoy Story will be in  cinemas from 29 July and the JT LeRoy books Sarah and The Heart is Deceitful Above All Things (Little, Brown) are being reissued to coincide with the film's release.

 More here

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Bookworm Rugs



The Bookworm Rug features a selection of spines from books, including Iain Banks's debut "The Wasp Factory" some Virginia Woolf, Charles Bukowksi and Haruki Murakami.

Via Boing Boing

Unattributed: A Reading List on Plagiarism

Longreads Blog presents six reads on plagiarism: from deep dives into infamous recent cases to essays that question the very possibility of writing that isn’t, to some extent, an act of unattributed borrowing.

A Staircase of Books


Via: Neatorama

See more pictures of the project at Buzzfeed.

(Image credit: Philippa Branham)

The Story Started With A Meatball...

For adventure racer Mikael Lindnord and Arthur the stray dog, it was friendship at first sight – so much so that Arthur followed him 100 miles in the forest.


The dog's loyalty and determination to follow his new friends along their hazardous journey through the Amazon jungle is a wonderful story.
Via 

Read the book: Arthur: the dog who crossed the jungle to find a home

Monday, July 18, 2016

Letter from Jane Austen to her sister Cassandra, 25 April 1811



In April 1811 Jane Austen, who was staying in London with her brother Henry, wrote to her sister Cassandra. The letter includes news about family and friends, as well as references to Austen’s novel Sense and Sensibility, which was published later that year.

Transcript and more:The British Library

The Troubled Typeface


Grant Snider of Incidental Comics drew this comic for the Summer/Fall 2016 issue of The Southampton Review.

Via Neatorama